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DBS Guidance: What is meant by EU & EAA

As you may be aware, the Disclosure & Barring Service (DBS) have launched new ID guidance recently to align the identity checking process with Right to Work checks.

The new guidance is quite detailed, below we have pulled out some of the main points:

  • It’s important to note that a DBS check does not provide evidence of a person’s right to work in the UK. You must do a separate check to make sure an applicant is allowed to work in the UK which also includes roles for voluntary work.
  • There are a number of different routes that need to be followed depending on if the applicant is an EEA national, a volunteer or is working in a household with children.

Since this guidance has been released, there has been a lot of confusion regarding the term ‘EEA national’ and what this entails.

Below we have broken down the meaning of EEA and countries within the EU.

EU

The European Union (EU) is an economic and political union of 28 countries. It operates an internal (or single) market which allows free movement of goods, capital, services and people between member states.

The EU countries are:

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the UK.

The European Economic Area (EEA)

The applicant is a European Economic Area (EEA) national if they are a citizen of one of the following countries. If they have permanent residence in, but not citizenship of, any of these countries, they are not an EEA national:

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

Switzerland is not a member of the EU or the EEA. However, Swiss nationals have rights which are similar to those of nationals of EEA countries. Therefore when applying for a DBS check, Swiss nationals are classed as EEA nationals.

Take a look at the following link to see the new ID guidance in full.

The following chart is to establish if an applicant is an EEA national or not and is only applicable for Standard & Enhanced checks only.

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